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Former Manchester United player Quinton Fortune has set his sights on becoming manager of the club one day.

The ex-South Africa international, a former teammate of current boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer at Old Trafford, has been working with United’s Under-23s for a year. He previously spent seven years as a player at the club between 1999 and 2006 and says his ambition in the future is to get the top job at Old Trafford.

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“I thought about that question yesterday for some reason and my first thought was to become the manager of Manchester United,” Fortune told the Manchester United Podcast.

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“That’s my dream. Of course, I’m starting now with the Under-23s and I’m learning a lot and I want to learn as much as possible because management changes so much in the game today.

“Look, I [may] have to go out and learn somewhere else and become a manager. But the dream, the ultimate dream, is to come back and be the manager of Manchester United. From what I’ve been through, I’m going for the highest level.”

There are just four black managers among English football’s 92 Football League clubs and players including Tottenham’s Danny Rose have questioned whether black coaches are given opportunities to work at the highest level.

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“I want to be given the job because of my ability,” said the 43-year-old Fortune. “I want to always be judged because of my character and what I can bring to the team, not because of the colour of my skin.

“When you look at the game, you see a lot of black players but why are there not many black managers? I don’t know what the reason is. I think if I go too deep into that it will block my way of thinking.

“I like to think I am going to work as hard as I can, get all my qualifications, prepare myself and not let that barrier stop me. And if there is a system put in place, great, but regardless of that I’m going to go and work anyway.”


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